Where in the world is Jai Paul?

With the long-anticipated release of a new Frank Ocean album finally coming to fruition, another equally elusive artist came to mind: Jai Paul.

Jai Paul is an artist who came into the scene having already formed a unique and personal sound, a sound that you can recognise as his own from hearing a few seconds of most of the songs he’s made. And trust, I’ve looked for similar styled artists, artists who try similar things in their experimental production, but it always feels as if they’re either not as good as Jai Paul or that they’re copying him rather blatantly.


Paul being elusive however is not to say he’s unknown – having only one demo underneath his belt, XL Recordings signed to him to a deal in 2010, releasing an edit of the track a year later in 2011. ‘BTSTU’ is a stunning track, especially considering it was Jai Paul’s first full-fledged effort. Juxtaposition is used to full effect, with half the track being led by a surprisingly powerful falsetto which is backed by a harmonic vocal melody, and the other introducing itself with wave after wave of distorted synth along with Paul’s regular singing voice. The whole track is chocked full of effects, and introduced us to one of Jai Paul’s personal favourites, the sidechain, providing moments of subdued almost-silence, a palpitation-like impact. Although the parts individually seem to be rather upbeat, ‘BTSTU’ at its heart is rather angry, the opening lines becoming comic once you understand what they actually are (something which can be quite difficult with Paul’s music):

“Don’t fuck with me, don’t fuck with me

Since you shipped my ass off to sea”

The demo provided Paul with a copious amount of media coverage, being played by DJs such as Zane Lowe and Annie Mac, as well as being sampled by heavyweights such as Drake  (‘Dreams Money Can Buy’) and Beyonce (‘The End of Time’).

A year later came his next track, ‘Jasmine’ which again received similar critical acclaim, once again being lauded by Lowe and Mac. Guitar features more prominently in the track, an electric guitar laying down the main chord progression whilst what seems to be a bass guitar with an auto-wah effect providing some funk-era vibes. ‘Jasmine’ also marks the formal appearance of Jai Paul’s brother, A.K. Paul, who is credited not only with bass design but also c0-writing props as well (A.K. Paul has since worked with artists such as Sam SmithEmeli Sande, and Miguel, but has also remained rather elusive). The tone of the song was less aggressive, more romanticised, presenting a desire for a something or a someone, rather than a push away from it.


Work with artists such as Big Boi on the track ‘Higher Res’ (upon which he left a definite mark) followed, until 2013, where an artist’s (especially an artist like Jai Paul) worst nightmare was realised – a Bandcamp album was released supposedly under the guise of it being Paul’s debut effort, with the internet being set ablaze before Paul himself said it was a leak. This didn’t stop the hype surrounding it though, Jai Paul being listed in various ‘Best Albums of the Year’ lists. In reality, it was obvious that the album was not ready to be released, the mixing on many of the tracks was extremely unbalanced (and not in an edgy, “ooh it’s Jai Paul so it’s fine” kind of way), and many of the recordings were almost too distorted. Perhaps most noticeably was the far inferior version of ‘Jasmine’ that featured on the album.


That being said, the leaked album is by far one of the most exciting and explosive listenings I’ve had the joy to experience. Explosive and far reaching synths, arcade-sounds, Harry Potter samples, Bollywood samples, extreme sidechaining, layered guitar, and more all combine to give an incredibly genre-bending and unique album. And yet despite this, we haven’t heard anything from Jai Paul since. No one knows if these tracks were the finished product, whether or not we should be listening to them, or whether or not Paul has simply thrown these tracks away (a testament to the skill and musicality of the artist). The last posts on Paul’s Twitter and Facebook have both been from 2013 stating that the album was indeed a leak – nothing else has appeared on either social media format:

Alas we have heard virtually nothing from Jai Paul since. This year he started The Paul Institute with his brother, though the only track that has surfaced from there has been A.K. Paul’s ‘Landcruisin”.

In the age of the internet where everything is at our fingerprints, Jai Paul has managed to stay out of the spotlight – do not think this is a show of disinterest, or a lack of desire to produce more music, rather it is a sign of perfectionism and knowledge of timing, that when he feels his music is ready to be revealed bare he will do so. And I, for one, will be eagerly awaiting the day.

This article was written by Mo Hafeez

Album Review – ‘Reverie’ by Tom Misch

Tom Misch, singer, guitarist, violinist, and producer, puts together a perfect Summer record with his EP Reverie. I had first ran into him whilst surfing those YouTube channels who are wanting to make themselves home to a particular style of music (think Majestic Casual, Holy Chill, Chillhop, etc.). The track I actually heard is featured on the EP, a collaboration with his saxophonist sister Laura Misch.

Tom Misch’s soothing voice pairs fantastically with the saxophone in the chorus, especially when the harmonies kick in. The double-bass behind the track has been beefed up in the low-end providing a more 808 like style, filling out the track considerably when paired with the drum loops. Lyrically there’s not much to be amazed by, but by no means does it hinder the track either, the scat “m-m m-m-m-m maybe” being a very nice touch and variation to the song.

Despite Misch’s instrumental prowess, he actually employs drum loops and all four tracks of the EP. This could have felt repetitive had the rest of the production not been rather interesting. Opener ‘Crazy Dream’ has a nice enveloped synthesiser which is joined by funk-inspired guitar and bass on the chorus. The rapping, whilst matching Misch’s soothing vocals, almost sound too smooth and relaxed, but again, it’s not a major upset or anything to criticise overly, especially when the lead synth is embedded beautifully towards the end of the track, and so Loyle Carner‘s feature does not go to waste.

‘I Wish’ features a snap-snared beat following a summery-acoustic guitar, an opening which remained me of Chance the Rapper’s ‘Favourite Song’ – I wasn’t quite sure of the chorus, it doesn’t quite fit with the more downtempo feeling of the song, the bass guitar and guitar pairing together to play a much upbeat riff. Had this solely comprised the chorus it would have been a questionable decision, but Misch adds his vocals prior to this little section, accentuated by crash cymbals to make it the change-up manageable.

‘Watch Me Dance’ closes the album, Misch’s violinist upbringing coming to the fore as the track is introduced with a lamenting string section which slips to the background as he brings in guitar and vocals. At around the 1 minute 40 second mark the name of the track comes to light as the kick drum drives the track forward with the bass guitar and guitar riffing away over the top of this.

The track really demonstrates his influences from funk, to hip-hop, to house as well. For someone who has yet to release a full-length debut album, Tom Misch is continuing to make waves, impressively selling out venues and embarking on his first US tour. I’ve yet to find a song that he’s written that I dislike, or rather that I don’t like, and so I hope he continues his ways and wish him success.

This article was written by Mo Hafeez

Album Review – ‘IV’ by BADBADNOTGOOD

I’ve talked in the past about how jazz as a genre constantly moves in cycles (to use Q-Tip’s language), and BADBADNOTGOOD are perhaps one of the figureheads of the most recent revival – earlier albums featured reformulated covers of hip-hop classics such as Slum Village’s ‘Fall in Love’, as well as fresher reimaginings coming in the form of, for example, Earl Sweatshirt’s ‘Earl’. They even dabbled in some shoe-gaze in covering My Bloody ValentineSuch albums also displayed a sort of humour and style that represented the fresh-faced persona of a trio who were barely entering adulthood.

IV however ditches the pig masks, cereal-eating, lion mascot dancing, Lil B shoutouts, and even the monochrome artwork used on past albums. It’s a maturation, a foot in the same river as Kamasi Washington (and ergo Kendrick Lamar), best represented by the introduction of Leland Whittey as a full-time member of the band – returning after a fantastic feature on III‘s ‘Confessions’, Whittey helps open the album with a solo on the electronica-infused ‘And That Too’, then taking centre-stage on the title-track which sounds as if it could have been pulled directly from To Pimp a Butterfly. His highlight is the high-energy battle with Arcade Fire contributor Colin Stetson, trading frantic and raspy saxophone lines back and forth in ‘Confessions II’:

The album also features a heavier amount of collaboration – Colin Stetson already mentioned, Kayranada lends his own sub-genre melting-pot style to ‘Lavender’ by providing buzzing synthesiers to the psychedelic and groove heavy journey, a sound reminiscent of Karreim Riggins‘ debut effort. Walking further down this road, Mick Jenkins perhaps shows BADBADNOTGOOD’s potential in the hip-hop genre when they’re not tied down to Ghostface Killah‘s nostalgia on previous album Sour Soul this is best seen in Alexander Sowinski’s drumming which is in this track is one-hundred times preferred to a drum machine. Again, following in similar veins as Washington and indeed Terrace Martin and Robert GlasperCharlotte Day Wilson‘s vocals provide a smooth-jazz atmosphere on ‘In Your Eyes’.

Perhaps the best feature is of Future Islands’ frontman Samuel Herring on ‘Time Moves Slow’, in essence a solemn follow up to the band’s reinterpretation of ‘Seasons (Waiting on You)’. Chester Hansen’s bass provides the engine for the track, whilst Sowinski once again spices up what could have been a very simple 16-beat drum loop, and adding Matthew Tavares’ organ-synth, it provides perfect backing for the wavering and crumbling vocals of Herring as he croons “running away is easy // it’s the leaving that’s hard”.

Amongst all of this however, it should be noted that it doesn’t feel like there’s a massive progression in sound – at the close of the BADBADNOTGOOD’s debut album, Sowinski is asked what he thinks of John Coltrane‘s widely-regarded seminal jazz album Giant Steps – he answers:

 “Fuck that shit, everyone’s played it, it’s 50 years old, it sounds like crap, write a new song, and stop playing that God damn song. I don’t care if you can fucking modulate it and change shit up, you can play it in seven, you can play it in nine: it’s fucking boring. That’s what I think about Giant Steps”.

There’s no such moment, no such feeling with this album – the band has grown up, but perhaps too much. If the title-track did not have Whittey’s saxophone on it it would have fitted in very neatly on previous albums with Tavares’ electric piano making light work of (rather impressive, it should be said) solos, and the strings featured in ‘In Your Eyes’ felt very similar to those employed on III. They have explored new ground in terms of their own personal musical journeys, but on the grand stage of the genre and music as a whole, this album appears to hold less weight. Closing track ‘Cashmere’ perhaps encapsulates these sentiments well – the quartet are obviously talented, there’s no doubting that, and Leland Whittey’s addition is a very welcome change, but it doesn’t feel like an exciting and fresh take on the genre. Yes, that’s a lot to expect from a band, but it’s the reputation that BADBADNOTGOOD have built for themselves, and so we should not be hasty to be disappointed with this effort.


This article was written by Mo Hafeez.

Album Review – ‘Coloring Book’ by Chance The Rapper

Why is the mastering so spotty on a fair amount of the songs, especially at the start ?

Why was ‘Grown Ass Kid’ not on the mixtape?

Why are there so many poor features?

Why is there so much gospel and so little rapping that caught my ears?

Why is Chance’s singing not on point?

Why did he release this mixtape behind an Apple-backed paywall?

These questions and more make me think that Coloring Book is not the album of the year, nor is it the hip-hop album of the year – I tried to give it some more time like I did with Views, which eventually did grow on me (‘U With Me?’, ‘Feel No Ways’, ‘Still There’ – very solid), but alas I haven’t bought a ticket for the hype train. If anything, this release has made me appreciate Acid Rap to a much greater extent. After ‘Ultralight Beam’ from The Life of Pablo, everyone was going crazy; most people agreed that it was one of, if not the, best verse on the album, and it got everyone excited for Chance’s next effort.


Let’s talk about the mix. The album starts off with ‘All We Got’, and if you love Kanye so much so that you’ll drown out the entire song leaving only slightly tolerable auto-tuned singing from the man himself, it doesn’t really set a good first impression. Chance sounds really good when he gets going in his first verse, and the flow is definitely reminiscent of his flow on ‘ULB’, but then Kanye comes in for the hook and the choir and trumpets are completely blocked from the mix; Chance returns afterwards and sounds quieter as a result. Similar things occur on the following track, with 2 Chainz appearing to be much louder than both Lil Wayne and Chance. Chance clashes with Francis & The Lights on ‘Summer Friends’ and the right-panned cellos towards the end sound a bit odd (granted that latter point is me being picky), the noise-based crescendo on ‘Blessings’ is interesting but is not quite pulled off, Chance’s verses change in volume on ‘All Night’, his hook on ‘Smoke Break’ is drowned out by the instrumental, and the list goes on and on. Of course these are only some of the tracks, and other tracks like ‘How Great’ and ‘Angels’ are mixed perfectly well, but it doesn’t make up for it. The fact that this is a mixtape is not an excuse.

How about the features? I’ve already talked about Kanye’s contribution, but that wasn’t the only questionable addition to the album, of which there are many (perhaps too many?). ‘Mixtape’, featuring verses from Young Thug and Lil Yachty, instrumentally sounds like it belongs on a Thugger mixtape, and sees Chance try and emulate the trap-style flow that the other two bring. Stylistically I understand the features, all three of them being rappers who have utilised the mixtape to great effect, but it doesn’t fit with the rest of mixtape at all, especially since it follows ‘Same Drugs’ (a song which has no listed features), a touching ballad using drug usage as metaphor explaining his fading relationship with a girl, whilst also displaying Chance’s singing chops which appear patchy in tracks like ‘Blessings’ and ‘All Night’. Justin Beiber felt like a shameless commercial throw-in, bringing a nice voice, sure, but it feeling like an antithesis to Chance’s ethos. Again, there are strong features on here as well however – Saba provides a fantastic chorus on ‘Angels’ whilst being backed by steel pans (truly a summer banger which I will be rinsing), and Future provides a nice contrast to Chance’s style on ‘Smoke Break’. Perhaps best of all is Jay Electronica, starting his verse with the Lion King references, paired with interesting flow which picks up pace towards the end definitely makes ‘How Great’ a highlight on the album.

I haven’t touched too much on the positives of this album, as there are plenty of reviews out there which have raved about them, and yes there are a fair few good moments on the record. ‘Same Drugs’ is an extra shot of emotional Chance after ‘Blessings’ as mentioned above, as well as the steel pans on ‘Angels’ which I’ve also already mentioned, paired with some cracking lines from Chance as well like “This what it sounds like when God splits an atom with me” (and his flow brings undeniable energy and comedy to boot). ‘My cousin Nicole‘s chants of “How great is God” is a really uplifting intro on the track, keeping things fresh enough to stop their part from getting stale, and the hook on ‘No Problem’ is very catchy indeed.


Those tracks will definitely stay in my listening rotation for sure, but I still can’t help but say I am slightly disappointed with this album. It’s not the hip-hop album of the year, and it probably won’t go down as a classic either. Yes, it’s nice to hear from Chano after such a long time, and perhaps I’m too slow to keep up with his stylistic changes, but this was an underwhelming experience to say the least. I still remember my first listen, sat in the lounge of my university accommodation with my good friend Rob, just pointing out so much that was below par with the mixtape. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not a bad album – its far from it in fact – but it’s not a great album in my eyes. Maybe the bar was set too high with Acid Rap? Who knows.

This article was written by Mo Hafeez


Album Review – ‘Views’ by Drake

Track Highlights and Track Lowlights (Mo Hafeez)

HIGHLIGHT: ‘U With Me?’ – the first track where Drake outshines the production, Kanye West and 40 take away from what easily could have been one of the best musical moments from Drake we would have heard – the third verse ends in a crescendo with a half-sing and a half-shout of the very quotable line “A lot of n-ggas try to cut the cheque so they can take this flow”. The first half of the song can seem a bit slow in comparison, but it’s a price I’d pay just for that 3rd verse. Drizzy shows he’s still down with the kids with mentions of DMs, LOL, grey chunks and three dots.

HIGHLIGHT: ‘Weston Road Flows’ – Drake finally dedicates more than 2 or 3 lines at a time to his childhood and growing up in Toronto, and he pulls it off really well. He talks about his friend Renny whilst growing up, the antics they got up to even when Renny’s elder brother told them not to follow his path. Very biographical, very personal. Nostalgic and smoky production with the Mary J. Blige sample adds to this, Drake dropping hooks altogether and opting for a constant stream form instead.

HIGHLIGHT: ‘Still Here’ – maybe the hardest beat on the album, the old Drake returns to devastating effect. That classic Drake flow is here as he raps about his accomplishments, the obstacles he’s hurdled by himself, whilst still giving shout outs to his closest friends and family in Toronto.

LOWLIGHT: ‘With You’ – I didn’t enjoy the PARTYNEXTDOOR features on If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late and I didn’t really enjoy him here either. Even though he comes centre-stage this time, it’s easily one of the more forgettable tracks on the album.

LOWLIGHT: ‘Grammys’ – Future returns with mediocre chemistry and one of the worst hooks on the album. It’s repetitive, not clever, and generally just doesn’t sound good. It was probably recorded at the same time as their collaborative album which itself was below parr for the duo. Drake is okay on the track and has interesting flow switches, but that hook man, that hook. If anything it tells you why Drake didn’t win a Grammy.

LOWLIGHT: ‘Summers Over Interlude’ – this a fucking long album yes, but this interlude is just so out of place that it makes little sense. Maybe he thought people would be tired of the similar sounding style and he switched it up big time? According to OVO Sound Radio the album was meant to be moulded around Toronto’s seasons, but if so this is really grasping at straws. Lupe did it better on Tetsuo & Youth.

Closing thoughts (Tobias Berchtold)

The hype and the build up around this Drake release made me expect something that would be a landmark album for him, something to solidify his position at the very peak of hip hop. Drake is in such a strong position right now to express himself and experiment with his style and do something new. That’s why I’m so surprised at how mediocre this album is.

The thing that bothers me most is that this album is just incredibly boring – there’s nothing new or interesting to get your head around at all. It’s the same old Drake sound, and while for some that’s ideal, for me it shows a lack of progress. Of the 20 songs on the album there are maybe a handful that I honestly enjoyed – ‘U With Me’, ‘Hype’, ‘Weston Road Flows’, and ‘Still Here’ in particular stand out. I think the common theme with these songs is that they all could have fit in easily on If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late – whereas the rest of the album feels more like they’re from Nothing Was The Same.

I wish more of the album was like ‘Weston Road Flows’, which is an incredibly biographical account of Drake’s time in Toronto before coming up in the rap game. With the original album title being Views from the 6 and the cover of Drake sitting on Toronto’s radio tower, this is what I was expecting this album to be. Alas.

But on a ridiculously long (20 song) album these moments are few and far between – so much so that when I got half way through I was actually dreading the fact that there was about 40 minutes of runtime left. There are easily six or seven songs that could be cut from this album and nothing much of substance would be lost in my eyes.

Drake is no stranger to slightly cringey lyrics but this record contains some of his worst offerings yet (see below). I found some of the song really painful to listen to because of the downright awful subject matter and lyrics. ‘Child’s Play’ is really the icing on the cake – the songs chronicles an argument Drake had with his girl at the Cheesecake Factory, which then leads to Drake hiding his car keys so she can’t go out to buy tampons. Come on man, really?

Bring back the ghostwriters

“Always saw you for what you could’ve been ever since you met me / Like when Chrysler made that one car that looked just like the Bentley.”

“And I turn the six upside down, it’s a nine now”

“You toying with it like Happy Meal”

“Your best day is my worst day, I get green like Earth Day”

“Why you gotta fight with me at Cheesecake? You know I love to go there”

“Got so many chains call me Chaining Tatum”

“I pull up in yachts so big that they try to hit me with boat fines”

“Tipping scales, bars heavy like triple XL”

The established Drake style obviously works for him – this album sold like crazy so he’s not going to change his approach any time soon, but personally I think Drake has the range and ability to step out of his comfort zone and make something more interesting. For me the scales have tipped on Drake – his emotionally open songs about relationships have broken the border into becoming incredibly annoying and whiny. Views feels like a massive step back from If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late which is easily my favourite project Drake has released – this latest feels more like a sequel to Nothing Was the Same, which I really did not enjoy at all.

5/10 – turn the five upside down, and unfortunately it’s still a five.

This article was written by Tobias Berchtold and Mo Hafeez

Album Review: ‘The Colour in Anything’ by James Blake

James Blake has a signature sound, a style that means when you hear the first 10 seconds of most of his tracks you’ll instantly be able to recognise it as him. True, he is not alone in the field of minimalist electronic R&B and pop, though other artists/groups like the xx and Mount Kimbie are always chasing, both vocally and via production also.

Although the deep and aching piano chords, finely used autotune, saw and pulse-based synths, and idiosyncratic percussion remain, it does feel just a bit different from past releases – it’s still minimalist, but his voice is higher in the mix, and it really makes a difference in filling out the tracks just that bit more.

It could be the increased collaboration you hear on the album too – Blake in the past has been very limited on this front, but here Rick Rubin co-produces on various tracks, Bon Iver returns on ‘I Need a Forest Fire’, and Frank Ocean chips in for some writing credits too. Kanye West was reportedly providing a verse on the track ‘Timeless’, but the verse didn’t materialise and the atmosphere of the album changed (trust me, Kanye would be really out of place on this record). Add in his input on Beyoncé’s Lemonade, and The Colour in Anything really does represent a shift for the London artist.

The album’s a hefty 17 tracks, and it does take a bit out of you after every listen – it’s much longer than his previous efforts. The transitions are smooth enough though, and there are more than enough new sounds introduced do keep it fresh. Classic James Blake themes are on the album, from missed love, self-doubt, grapples with loneliness and so on – the opening lines to the album are “I can’t believe this, you don’t wanna see me”, as reserved piano chords are played beneath, and Blake recounts miscommunications and love lost. If I’m completely honest, it’s very whiney, and the lyrical content is not consistent across the whole album, but the falsetto-laden singing imbues an extra layer of emotion that allows Blake to get away with it.

The vocal humming melodies return to full effect on the following track, ‘Love Me in Whatever Way’, casting minds back to Blake’s classic song ‘Retrograde’ from previous album Overgrown. Noise slowly fills the sonic landscape as reverb is gradually added to Blake’s voice, and the synth filter is slowly peeled away to provide an enormous crescendo of lament. It definitely helps that it’s lyrically stronger than the opener:

“Giving up is hard to do”

Other lyrical highlights include the solemn request on ‘Waves Know Shores’, “I suggest you love like love’s no loss”, and the imagery provided on single ‘Modern Soul’, “So I swim to you while I’m sleeping// through sage green rivers of England”. The intense sound that opens the track and triggers later on throughout still intrigues me; I have no idea what it is, but it’s a great pairing with the sweeping dives of synths. Although it’s obviously about relationship struggles, the refrain that appears in the middle of the track suggest some kind of unrest and unhappiness with the touring life, with the musical life wrenching him away from friends and family – he sighs “Because of a few songs” over and over before he recounts a split from a partner.

The title track sees Blake get rid of synths and experimental percussion, opting for his voice and the keys to carry the listener through the three-and-a-half minute ballad. The eclectic run up to it may have listeners even somewhat bored as they listen to, the double-tracking in the chorus the only pick-up. Such a thing is very purposeful however, giving space for Blake set up an emotional sucker punch of a track whilst showing off his piano chops. Again, it casts your mind back to another track, Blake’s phenomenal cover of Joni Mitchell’s ‘A Case of You’.

Even though it’s a much fuller album than past efforts, it’s still modest – on the closing track Blake opts to get rid of all instruments, and delivers a palate-cleansing acapella, displaying dexterity with the vocoder. Everything and everyone seems to have left him, but he holds some optimism. He closes “Music can’t be everything”, an oddly strange sentiment considering Blake’s past soundscape exploration, but oddly beautiful at the same time. Ghostly and emotional as always, Blake continues to deliver.

This article was written by Mo Hafeez.

Up and Coming: Strange Collective

I got an email about these guys roughly a week or so ago, along with a link to their latest release: ‘Heavy’. I’ve been on a recent spree of listening to HOMESHAKE, Mac DeMarco, Tame Impala, Temporex, The Allah-Las, and so on, and this really fit right in with those names. Obviously they’re not quite at that calibre yet, but from what’s been said about them I definitely look forward to see where they’ll end up –

A Liverpudlian quartet, they specialise in a psychedelic-laced form of garage rock. Guitars laden with reverb aplenty, and an unexpected change-up that lurches into action in the latter quarter of the track make for a great listen. The vocals are most definitely the highlight of the main segment though, Alex Wynne providing the lead with exciting yelps, and when the backing vocals come in during the chorus it really works well. It almost feels cinematic – I could definitely imagine it featuring in an opening or closing shot of a film, the change-up providing a shot of energy, the more laid-back beginning bringing out that ‘tying-up-of-loose-ends-but-unsure-if-it’s-a-happy-ending’ kind of feeling. The only thing I may have changed was perhaps a bit of reverb on the percussion, especially the starting fill which opens up the the main verse arrangement. They do fit nicely in when the lead and bass come in though, a hazy summer’s day vibe for sure.

The track, along with the few other recordings they’ve put out, apparently show a much tamer side, their live sets at Liverpool Music Week, Sound City Festival, and Liverpool Psych Fest being noted for their explosiveness and charismatic performances.

Strange Collective’s debut EP Super Touchy will be released by Salvation Records on the 1st of July, and they look set to begin touring the UK soon as well. If they come by Newcastle or Manchester, I’ll personally be trying to grab a ticket for sure.

This article was written by Mo Hafeez.